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Mashable Muses While Tinder CEO Sean Rad Confuses: The Match Group IPO

Mashable Muses While Tinder CEO Sean Rad Confuses: The Match Group IPO

November 18, 2015

Sean Rad has a pathological history of sexism: Whitney Wolfe and recently with Vanity Fair writer Nancy Jo Sales

Sean Rad has a pathological history of sexism: Whitney Wolfe and recently with Vanity Fair writer Nancy Jo Sales

Sean Rad is the CEO of Tinder for one very simple reason: he’s easily manipulated by investors or he’s a CE(N)O. Companies like The Match Group or Venture Capital firms purposely hire underqualified  CEOs who are easily manipulated & desperate to keep their job and status as CEO, who are then willing to engage in unethical and or illegal behavior on behalf of the company to quickly prove they can achieve ROI for investors.

Tinder’s CEO Sean Rad’s latest baffling behavior has  Mashable’s Seth Fiegerman comically muses about why companies are quiet before IPO’s.

On the eve of his parent company’s public offering, Tinder CEO and cofounder Sean Rad gave a baffling and embarrassing interview to The Evening Standard, in which he muses about doing “background research” to discredit a journalist who wrote an unflattering story of the app and eagerly boasts about turning down the advances of a “really famous” supermodel.

The truly awkward moment comes when Rad tries and fails to explain his attraction to women who are “intellectual” rather than beautiful.

Fiegerman warns not to read the rest of his piece if you cringe easily, but if you read here often, you’ve either lived through your own (startup) sexism stories or vicariously through mine at this point, so head over (ahem-after reading this) for a good laugh.

Med tech doesn't have as many venture-backed billion dollar unicorns but NEA funded ExploraMed incubated startup Acclarent purchased by Johnson & Johnson for $785 million where former CEO & VP of Sales were arrested & indicted on 18 counts of fraud

Med tech doesn’t have as many venture-backed billion dollar unicorns, but NEA funded ExploraMed incubated startup Acclarent purchased by Johnson & Johnson for $785 million, where former CEO & VP of Sales were arrested & indicted on 18 counts of fraud demonstrates the pattern in startup fraud we’re likely to see from tech in the coming years. This is also why we’ll see companies like Square and Uber file for an IPO only to pull it six months later claiming “unfavorable market conditions.” Filing of IPOs exposes potential fraud within startups, quickly. An IPO for Square is the beginning of the end. 

SEC POTENTIAL WARNING FOR IPO FRAUD

Both The Match Group ($MTCH) and Square ($SQ) are set to IPO tomorrow and if the SEC is paying attention they’ll not allow investors to pull out immediately until they’re able to show sustainable growth over two years. If both companies IPO then watch for massive layoffs in both companies in the next six to 12 months.  As this business model, likely built on false projections, cannot sustain sales and employees will unfairly be blamed for mismanagement from the top. Initial investors will pull out all their money as soon as possible leaving long-term investors/shareholders with worthless stock.

Unethical startups almost always engage in company-wide sexismUber Growth and Sales cannot meet the vaulation Killing My Career, where it’s applauded, encouraged, replicated and rewarded while the victims are ignored, retaliated against  then terminated,  which is always a trigger for far greater fraud within the companies. A very common fraud we’ll see much more of in tech (it’s finally catching up to its little sister medtech) are false sales projections which lead to hypergrowth and fraudulent overvaluation of the company.

#GodsOfFrauds Unethical Startups Hypergrowth Fraud IPO Square #TheSociopathicBusinessModel

We’ve seen a similar pattern recently with CEO Jack Dorsey’s Square falling $2 billion short in valuation for their IPO, and we’ll see this again with CEO Travis Kalanick of Uber, who now claims his company is too young to IPO (way to spin it Travis). The false projections which lead to the appearance of hypergrowth can’t IPO and still make money for investors, so they file the IPO (pull it six months later stating “unfavorable market conditions”) where their only option is to sell the company.  Initial investors make their money + back, but long-term investors/shareholders just purchased a fraud and will lose money.

Something this site has tried to expose for the last two years and became personally known to me in 2008 and brought forward after my wrongful termination in 2011

Something this site has tried to expose for the last two years which became personally known to me in 2008, when documented sexism was ignored, met with retaliation and brought forward after my wrongful termination in 2011

Startup tech is following a very similar pattern to the industry’s little sister, medtech, when it comes to fraud. Reference: NEA Funded ExploraMed Incubated startup Acclarent that was acquired by Johnson & Johnson for $785 million in 2010 to see the pattern.

By the time shareholders start to understand the fraud, and when the U.S. Department of Justice & SEC starts to investigate, the Group or VC’s go unnoticed because they have an easily manipulated, underqualified CEOs to take the fall for them while they start the fraud cycle all over again with a new startup all at taxpayer expense. #TheSociopathicBusinessModel

More proof Boards pick underqualified easily manipulated CEOs.

More proof Boards pick underqualified easily manipulated CEOs.

Not until we take the billion dollar blinders off of startup #GodsOfFrauds, where unethical & illegal behavior is entrenched in the business model, will we see the likes of the Sean Rads of the world disappear from the CEO landscape, where investors are forced accountable by the shareholders.  Fiegerman cleverly states in his Mashable piece that Rad was installed as Tinder’s CEO briefly uninstalled then recently reinstalled pre-IPO, hopefully, this explains why Rad is CEO and also why no one (least of all Rad) should be surprised when he’s permanently uninstalled in the very near future, for his sake let’s hope he fares better than these guys from NEA funded ExploraMed incubated startup Acclarent which sold to Johnson & Johnson for $785 million in 2010.

Facteau & Fabian

Facteau & Fabian

 

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