web analytics

Johnson & Johnson’s (JNJ) DePuy Synthes Ran “Amok” Marketing Pinnacle Hips-Jury Told

Johnson & Johnson’s (JNJ) DePuy Synthes Ran “Amok” Marketing Pinnacle Hips-Jury Told

September 4, 2014

#ForcedAccountabilityJNJ

#PRSpinUnSpunJNJ

#JNJCleanUpYourMesh

#JNJExecutivesBannedForLife

Johnson & Johnson Federal Cases September 2014

Johnson & Johnson’s subsidiary DePuy Synthes’ first of their 6,000 federal cases for a hip implant known as Pinnacle began in Dallas under U.S. District Judge Ed Kinkeade this week.  These cases are different from the Johnson & Johnson DePuy Synthes’ ASR hip implants where 93,000 devices were recalled and JNJ agreed to pay $2.5 billion in a settlement with The Department of Justice. 

According to Bloomberg:

Johnson & Johnson’s  DePuy Synthes unit ignored signs the Pinnacle hips suffered from design flaws and assured doctors the metal devices worked “99.9 percent of the time,” Mark Lanier, a lawyer for a Montana woman who sued after complications forced her to have the device removed, told jurors today in Dallas federal court on the first day of trial of her lawsuit.

“They didn’t tell people they were basically guinea pigs,” Lanier said in opening statements.

Lanier’s client, 58-year-old Kathleen Herlihy-Paoli, claims the metal hips made by Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), the world’s largest health-care company, leaked cobalt and chromium material into her bloodstream, causing an infection that required the devices to be surgically removed.

Much like in the 22,000 federal cases Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon’s Gynecare faces in West Virginia under U.S. District Judge Joseph Goodwin the Pinnacle hip cases are consolidated to one location (Dallas) to aid the federal court system.  So currently Johnson & Johnson has over 26,000 cases in federal court (that we’re aware of-that’s not to say others won’t file suits later or counting those False Claims cases under seal that the public doesn’t yet know about).

All of that’s on top of  Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals paying $2.2 billion in 2013 to  The Department of Justice for Risperdal.

Johnson & Johnson’s (JNJ) bid to convince doctors the metal-on-metal version of its Pinnacle hip implants were safe amounted to “marketing run amok,” a Lanier told jurors in the first case over the devices to go to trial.

Fact based evidence over time supports that Johnson & Johnson’s marketing isn’t the only thing to “run amok” at the company; and, until The Department of Justice stops allowing companies like JNJ to “do a crime and pay a fine” and starts holding executives to the “do the crime do time” philosophy we’re likely to see JNJ holding court in all 50 states.

Note to media:  Please use Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) and each their subsidiaries each time throughout the story to not allow them to distance from their crimes via SEO.  This isn’t Europe where “right to be forgotten” applies after all. Also the use of (JNJ) over J&J as it links to the company’s finance and stock for greater company accountability.

UPDATED
Johnson & Johnson DePuy Synthes officials said in emails that they had planned to tell colleagues to “keep quiet for now,” about extensive tissue damage done by the device back in 2010.

 

 

3 Comments
  • Gerald Tubbs
    Reply

    Johnson and Johnson are guilty of Inversion and are stealing from the American people! I give you this J&J your smart in your plan to take advantage of the less fortunate!

    Can someone let Johnson and Johnson Inc. know; that America wants its 2 BILLION in taxes for 2013! We owe them money when it’s all said and done! Somehow; I find this math formula to be incorrect, when there was an 18.1 Billion in increased sales for J&J (2014 first quarter)!
    The Pinnacle is a faulty product and there is scientific evidence to prove this fact, yet J&J keep using their money to buy their way around the law!

    Sign my petition requesting a congressional investigation into the finical and safety practices of Johnson’s and Johnson’s INC (JNJ). I thank you for your support in the search for the truth. http://wh.gov/ii9Vw

    September 29, 2014 at 12:44 pm
  • John
    Reply

    I work for them, and am not surprised at all. I wouldn’t put the managers in charge of anything important in my facility cause they choose who has to follow procedure. Its very sad to hear the effect their negligence can have on the patient. Sorry.

    October 5, 2015 at 8:48 pm

Post a Comment