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Chip On My Shoulder

I’ve often been told that I like to challenge authority, and not surprisingly, I disagree. I like truth, logic and fact-based evidence. And I’ve found that those in authority often feel challenged when asked questions seeking clarification. In hindsight, I suppose I began killing my career in kindergarten since I often asked a lot of questions of my teachers.

The dismissive nature of responses, whether it was because they did not know the answer or because they did not want to be transparent, have often made me feel shameful or foolish just for seeking the truth. In turn, unanswered questions have created a sense of frustration for me, and put a bit of a “chip on my shoulder.”

That chip on my shoulder grew to a boulder on my shoulder while working for Acclarent, a then Menlo Park, CA based, venture capital-funded startup. It began with a pervasive pattern of sexism that was ignored when I complained, or often encouraged, replicated and rewarded by the largely male company.  Documentation through Human Resources resulted in my direct manager being forced to take “sensitivity training” twice.  Despite my requests to report to another manager, I remained under his management, faced retaliation, and was soon placed on a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) while at 93 per cent of quota heading into the last sales quarter in 2008. That’s like getting kicked out of Harvard for making an A-.

This is when I learned to start thinking of my company’s Human Resource department like a spouse’s divorce attorney, there to protect the company and not the employee, even though I’d always assumed I too would be protected and assisted by HR.

Peruse this:

Two reps, hired in 2006 at Acclarent for the exact same position, one male and one female. Consistent variables were maintained between the reps, yet when the company was sold in 2010 and stock options were exercised:

  • Male made $200,000 on his stock options
  • Female made $140,000 on her stock options

I also learned that when a company ignores valid claims of sexism, racism and retaliation, then that company is far more likely to be engaged in far greater unethical and or illegal activity — certainly the case at Acclarent.

Our careers are one of most important relationships in our lives and yet we put up with abuse at work that we certainly wouldn’t tolerate in our personal lives.  We’ve been manipulated by abusive companies into thinking that because they’re paying us, they are allowed to abuse us. That we should just be grateful that we have jobs or if we’re unwilling to tolerate the abuse someone else will.  That’s where abusive companies are correct and why it’s so important that employees come forward and report all workplace abuse.

Understanding Workplace Abuse

These major factors help employees determine if they’re being abused in the workplace:

  • Pathologically overlook employee EEOC rights
  • Management’s inconsistent & contradictory language to action
  • Abusive management engaged in criminal activity
    Unchecked unethical & illegal corporate behavior will escalate while being encouraged, replicated and rewarded at a high cost to the public until the company is forced accountable.

Companies with a well-documented pathological history of unethical & illegal behavior will only change when forced otherwise that behavior will continue being encouraged, replicated & rewarded at taxpayer expense.  The three most effective ways to expose the corrupt’s negative truth they’d rather remain hidden as a means to create positive change are:

Current/past employees
Consumer/patient victims
Shareholders/taxpayers
Media
Employee Whistleblowers

The initial trigger for determining if a company is possibly employing tactics from The Sociopathic Business Model™ is human resources denial or ignoring of The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or EEOC complaints of employees, where, retaliation, race, and sex, lead the charges.

Checklist-of-Characteristic-of-The-Sociopathic-Business-Model (1)Dating-and-Career-Signs-of-Abuse

Steps to Protect From The Sociopathic Buisness Model™


EEOC Statistics

The-Sociopathic-Business-Model™ EEOC to Case Study

The Sociopathic Business Model™ maintains that if a company is willing to illegal overlook the rights of their employees, then the company is engaged in far greater unethical and or illegal behavior.

The-Sociopathic-Business-Model™ Encouraged, Replicated and Rewarded

Employees (unknowingly become accomplices to the corrupt or The Sociopathic Business Model™) armed with false information then dispense that information to the public causing harm and costing shareholders & taxpayers billions.  The results of which, we’re seeing from the automotive industry to the pharmaceutical and medical device industry with deadly results.  Those employees that discover and expose the negative truth of this corrupt business model are met with threats, intimidation and ultimately termination where the employee accomplice becomes a victim in this broken system.

2010–> 99,922 Total Claims

Retaliation=36,258

Race Discrimination=35,890

Sex Discrimination=29,029

2011–> 99,947 Total Claims

Retaliation=37,334

Race Discrimination=35,395

Sex Discrimination=28,534

2012–>99, 412 Total Claims

Retaliation=37,836

Race Discrimination=33,512

Sex Discrimination=30,356

2013–> 93,727 Total Claims

Retaliation=38,539

Race Discrimination=33,068

Sex Discrimination=27,687

2014–>88,788 Total Claims

Retaliation=37,955

Race Discrimination=31,073

Sex Discrimination=26,027

This site challenges those numbers would likely be 3-4 times higher if proven retaliation wasn’t such a strong deterrent from preventing employees from coming forward. Companies often use threats, fear, and intimidation to manage; and, not just while the employee is at that company, it’s not uncommon to try and ruin an employee’s career in the industry.

 

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